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Physics Exams and Tests

Standardized Tests

SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test)

Exam and Test Preparation

Physics

Exams and Tests

How much is the required time to prepare for SAT 2 physics?

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4 Answers

Hariharan Srinivasulu

Hariharan Srinivasulu , Took a few of them, read a lot about them.

An India specific answer:

Get Princeton Reviews Physics book. Yes, its far easier than Barrons, but its all youll need (to learn the theory for the test). Barrons is overkill, and will do you no good.

Skim through the book. Solve the problems at the end of each chapter to see which can be skipped.

CBSE would have drilled physics so far into you that SAT physics will be a breeze.

If youre in 11th: youll probably only need to learn electricity & magnetism related topics, light, sound and modern physics.

You only need a basic understanding of these topics, and all the formulae. This can be done in a few hours if necessary, but Id suggest spacing it all out between two weeks.

If youre in 12th: Read whatever you dont know in modern physics alone (usually, relativity isnt taught so read that)

Once youre done learning, do as many practise tests as you can. Borrow/Buy all the books you can (incl. Barrons if youre a daredevil) and solve all the practise tests.

Score yourselves. Most importantly, take the time to analyse your mistakes. I cant emphasize the importance of this enough. Revising the chapters that I tripped up on helped me immensely.

For good measure, 6–7 tests should do. Since each is under an hour, you can do all this within 14 hours (you MUST spend an hour on each test for analysis). Once again, I suggest spacing this out over 3–4 days.

Last, but now least. If its 11PM on the day before the test and youve studied nothing, dont fret. The curve on the test is soooo lenient, and the questions are far, far easier than CBSEs usual fare.

If you truly know nothing, learn all the formulae.

You only need a score of around 60 out of 75 for an 800 on the test (dont quote me on it – it tends to be around the 60 – 65 range). You can do it.

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Maiki Rainton

Maiki Rainton , 800 Physics

Yeah it honestly depends on the person. I personally did probably around 4 weeks worth of decent study, the first two over weekends because I had school, and then the next two spread over around 3 days for each.

I definitely recommend getting the princetons and barrows books as well. Do the practice tests and make sure youre getting good scores, or are at least improving throughout. I also just recommend reading up whatever parts you need to work on. Surprisingly for this part I found sparknotes really good.

I also highly recommend making flashcards of all the equations. The problems on the test are not generally deep and memorizing an equation can often be the difference between getting the extra problem or not.

Finally I recommend checking college confidential as there are a lot resources there.

Personally the first time I took it around I didnt think I did that great, and actually cancelled my test scores before they even came back. So I guess definitely prepare yourself until you feel comfortable. And dont feel bad if you dont do as well you do the first time. 🙂 The second time I took it about the month later that I could soonest take it, I got an 800 so theres that for you as well.

Note, I also took physics AP beforehand,so understand how much you might need to learn as well. If you didnt, it may be significantly harder.

Good luck though! ;p

Aurek Chattopadhyay

Aurek Chattopadhyay , studying CSE at NIT Rourkela

It depends on how much you know the subject. How many years you have spent studying physics (i.e. how much of the content you already know).

I would recommend you buy “Princeton SAT Subject Test Physics.” It’s a really good book. Don’t miss a single line of the book. Understand each and every word properly and solve all the sample problems given in the book and you will end up with a very good score.

If you study for 3 hours daily, one month will be more than sufficient.

In case you need some more work for practice (though I don’t think that would be necessary): w ww.cracksat.net .

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Tina Zhang

Tina Zhang , B.Sc. Physics, California Institute of Technology (2021)

It absolutely depends on how good you are at physics, and how much of the requisite content the high school course you took covers. (Another answerer has already said that, but affirmation makes us both more credible, yes?)

I’ll let you in on a secret: the questions are really shallow, and youre allowed to get a lot of them wrong. They almost never ask questions that would challenge you if you knew the content well. And, believe it or not, you can get 12 out of 75 incorrect and still get 800. Therefore, you dont need a thorough knowledge of the content—a superficial knowledge will be sufficient.

That should save you a lot of time. I recommend buying Barron’s or Princeton Review or whichever brand of SAT textbook you prefer and just reading the topics to make sure you know them. Only do practice questions if you’re really unsure of your footing in a particular topic.

Personally, I think it took me around three days’ worth of studying after school. Your mileage may vary—maybe youve done all the content before, or maybe you’re not as confident in physics. Just do a diagnostic test and see how you get on.

This page may be out of date. Submit any pending changes before refreshing this page.
Hide this message .

Physics Exams and Tests

Standardized Tests

SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test)

Exam and Test Preparation

Physics

Exams and Tests

How much is the required time to prepare for SAT 2 physics?

ad by Chipper
Free online study planner – get free access today.
Manage your studies in minutes. Use Chipper to organize all your classwork & studying in a whole new way.
Sign Up at getchipper.com
4 Answers

Hariharan Srinivasulu

Hariharan Srinivasulu , Took a few of them, read a lot about them.

An India specific answer:

Get Princeton Reviews Physics book. Yes, its far easier than Barrons, but its all youll need (to learn the theory for the test). Barrons is overkill, and will do you no good.

Skim through the book. Solve the problems at the end of each chapter to see which can be skipped.

CBSE would have drilled physics so far into you that SAT physics will be a breeze.

If youre in 11th: youll probably only need to learn electricity & magnetism related topics, light, sound and modern physics.

You only need a basic understanding of these topics, and all the formulae. This can be done in a few hours if necessary, but Id suggest spacing it all out between two weeks.

If youre in 12th: Read whatever you dont know in modern physics alone (usually, relativity isnt taught so read that)

Once youre done learning, do as many practise tests as you can. Borrow/Buy all the books you can (incl. Barrons if youre a daredevil) and solve all the practise tests.

Score yourselves. Most importantly, take the time to analyse your mistakes. I cant emphasize the importance of this enough. Revising the chapters that I tripped up on helped me immensely.

For good measure, 6–7 tests should do. Since each is under an hour, you can do all this within 14 hours (you MUST spend an hour on each test for analysis). Once again, I suggest spacing this out over 3–4 days.

Last, but now least. If its 11PM on the day before the test and youve studied nothing, dont fret. The curve on the test is soooo lenient, and the questions are far, far easier than CBSEs usual fare.

If you truly know nothing, learn all the formulae.

You only need a score of around 60 out of 75 for an 800 on the test (dont quote me on it – it tends to be around the 60 – 65 range). You can do it.

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Maiki Rainton

Maiki Rainton , 800 Physics

Yeah it honestly depends on the person. I personally did probably around 4 weeks worth of decent study, the first two over weekends because I had school, and then the next two spread over around 3 days for each.

I definitely recommend getting the princetons and barrows books as well. Do the practice tests and make sure youre getting good scores, or are at least improving throughout. I also just recommend reading up whatever parts you need to work on. Surprisingly for this part I found sparknotes really good.

I also highly recommend making flashcards of all the equations. The problems on the test are not generally deep and memorizing an equation can often be the difference between getting the extra problem or not.

Finally I recommend checking college confidential as there are a lot resources there.

Personally the first time I took it around I didnt think I did that great, and actually cancelled my test scores before they even came back. So I guess definitely prepare yourself until you feel comfortable. And dont feel bad if you dont do as well you do the first time. 🙂 The second time I took it about the month later that I could soonest take it, I got an 800 so theres that for you as well.

Note, I also took physics AP beforehand,so understand how much you might need to learn as well. If you didnt, it may be significantly harder.

Good luck though! ;p

Aurek Chattopadhyay

Aurek Chattopadhyay , studying CSE at NIT Rourkela

It depends on how much you know the subject. How many years you have spent studying physics (i.e. how much of the content you already know).

I would recommend you buy “Princeton SAT Subject Test Physics.” It’s a really good book. Don’t miss a single line of the book. Understand each and every word properly and solve all the sample problems given in the book and you will end up with a very good score.

If you study for 3 hours daily, one month will be more than sufficient.

In case you need some more work for practice (though I don’t think that would be necessary): w ww.cracksat.net .

promoted by Rosetta Stone

6 surprising benefits of learning a language.
Want to be more creative, or better understand a different culture? A new language can help.
Learn More at rosettastone.com

Tina Zhang

Tina Zhang , B.Sc. Physics, California Institute of Technology (2021)

It absolutely depends on how good you are at physics, and how much of the requisite content the high school course you took covers. (Another answerer has already said that, but affirmation makes us both more credible, yes?)

I’ll let you in on a secret: the questions are really shallow, and youre allowed to get a lot of them wrong. They almost never ask questions that would challenge you if you knew the content well. And, believe it or not, you can get 12 out of 75 incorrect and still get 800. Therefore, you dont need a thorough knowledge of the content—a superficial knowledge will be sufficient.

That should save you a lot of time. I recommend buying Barron’s or Princeton Review or whichever brand of SAT textbook you prefer and just reading the topics to make sure you know them. Only do practice questions if you’re really unsure of your footing in a particular topic.

Personally, I think it took me around three days’ worth of studying after school. Your mileage may vary—maybe youve done all the content before, or maybe you’re not as confident in physics. Just do a diagnostic test and see how you get on.